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Imitation of Blacks

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CharlesMBlow2

 

by Charles M. Blow

Rachel Dolezal, a woman with no known black heritage, has apparently, through an elaborate scheme of deception and denial, claimed for years to be a product of black heritage.

This has sparked a national conversation about how race is constructed and enforced, to what extent it is cultural and experiential, and whether it is mutable and adoptable.

If this were simply a matter of a person appreciating, emulating or even appropriating the presentation and performance of a race other than the one society prescribes to her based simply on her appearance, it wouldn’t be a story.

But this isn’t simply that. This is about privilege, deceitful performance and a tortured attempt to avoid truth and confession by co-opting the language of struggle, infusing labyrinthine logic with the authority of the academy, and coat-tailing very real struggles of transgender people and transracial adoptees to defend one’s deception.

This is a spectacular exercise in hubris, narcissism and deflection.

And we have been distracted from real conversation about real things in order to try to contextualize a false life based on a false premise. For a moment, blackface seemed to matter more than actual black lives.

On this issue of appearance, Ezra Dolezal, her adopted brother, has described her transformation as a form of “blackface.” When Matt Lauer asked, “Have you done something to darken your complexion?” she responded, “I certainly don’t stay out of the sun.” (TMZ reported Wednesday that according to their “tanning sources,” Dolezal was a “loyal customer at Palm Beach Tan in Spokane” and “was a fan of Mystic Tan… a brand of spray tan.” Make of all that what you will.)

Dolezal added: “This is not some freak ‘Birth of a Nation’ mockery blackface performance. This is on a very real, connected level.”

Full stop. Let’s just marvel at the efficient catchphrase saturation in those sentences. She takes the whole universe of possible attacks and issues them in her own tongue as a method of neutralizing them. It is a clever, if calculated, bit of argumentation, the kind that one might practice in a mirror.

But Dolezal didn’t stop there. She also told the MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry, “I have really gone there with the experience, in terms of being a mother of two black sons and really owning what it means to experience and live blackness.”

Yes, but she did so by choice and with a trap door. She was always aware that she could remove her weave and stop tanning (assuming that’s true) and return to what society registers as whiteness. People of actual black heritage don’t have that option. Her sons don’t have that option. And make no mistake: Having that option is a privilege.

The whole notion of “transracial” as it has been applied to Dolezal is flawed in part because it isn’t equally available to all.

Whiteness in this country has historically been incredibly narrowly drawn to protect its purity, and this was not simply enforced by social mores, but also by law. Conversely, blackness was broadly drawn, serving as something of a collecting pool for anyone with even the most minute detectable and provable Negro ancestry. If you weren’t 100 percent white, you were black.

This meant that society became accustomed to blackness presenting visually in an infinite spectrum of possibilities, from pass-for-white lightness to obsidian darkness lacking all ambiguity.

This means that the way Dolezal was able to convincingly present and perform blackness as a light-skinned black woman is a form of one-directional privilege that simply isn’t available to a black person starting at the other end of the melanin spectrum.

Racial passing has been a societal feature probably for as long as race has been a societal construct. But it was more often practiced by a person who was not purely white by heritage passing herself or himself off as such. In some ways, this may have been understandable, even if distasteful, as these people identified as white in a society that privileged whiteness and devalued, diminished or attempted to destroy — both spiritually and physically — others.

Choosing a life of privilege over one of oppression must have seemed particularly attractive to some, particularly to those whose parents are different races and who, one could argue, could make the most compelling case to identify with whichever parent’s heritage they chose.

But Dolezal wasn’t passing in that sense. She was commandeering and concocting a biography of burden to obscure the shift and lay claim to authenticity.

According to a report in The Washington Post, however, the transracial-adoption (“when a child of one race is adopted by the family of another”) community has not taken kindly to being linked to Dolezal’s deception. Kimberly McKee, the assistant director of the Korean-American Adoptee Adoptive Parent Network and a professor at Grand Valley State University where she studies transracial adoption, told The Post, “You’re turning something that is a historical experience into something that’s almost being made a joke.”

A letter signed by McKee and 21 other scholars and advocates made the point even more forcefully: “We find the misuse of ‘transracial,’ describing the phenomenon of a white woman assuming perceived markers of ‘blackness’ in order to pass as ‘black,’ to be erroneous, ahistorical, and dangerous.”

Indeed, one would be hard pressed to find scientific support for transracialism, as it is being applied for Dolezal’s deception and identity, as a legitimate area of serious inquiry beyond a sociological phenomenon.

How can one be born discordant with a racial identity if race is a more socialized construct than rigid, biological demarcation and determinism? In other words, how can one be born discordant with an experience one has yet to have?

At best, this appears to be an issue of having an affinity for a culture that grows around a social construct. That is because, to my sense of it, cultural race identity has more scientific grounding than biological race identity, and those cultures of racial identity are in fact a response to the structure itself. Some people perform in response to their privilege and others to their lack thereof.

In that regard, one can not only like and want to emulate the look of another racial group (though, one must be ever-questioning of oneself as to what motivates this, making sure that it isn’t the outgrowth of self-hatred), but one can even prefer the culture that developed around that look.

But changing appearance and even cross-cultural immersion doesn’t alter the architecture of race that gave birth to and reinforced those differences in the first place.

Dolezal’s performance of blackness may have been born of affinity, but it was based on a lie — one she has never sufficiently recanted — and her feeble attempts to use professorial language and faux-intellectual obfuscations only add insult to the cultural injury.

(This column originally appeared in the New York Times JUNE 17, 2015 under the title “The Delusions of Rachel Dolezal”)

Charles M. Blow is a New York Times Columnist and nationally-known commentator: “I invite you to visit my blog By The Numbers, join me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter, or e-mail me at chblow@nytimes.com.”

Twitt
[post_excerpt] =>   by Charles M. Blow Rachel Dolezal, a woman with no known black heritage, has apparently, through an elaborate scheme of deception and denial, claimed for years to be a product of black heritage. This has sparked a national conversation about how race is constructed and enforced, to what extent it is cultural and experiential, ...read more [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-05 22:55:59 [post_date] => 2015-07-05 18:55:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-07-05 22:55:59 [post_modified] => 2015-07-05 18:55:59 [post_status] => pending [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/?p=8005 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => The Buffalo Bullet [syndication_source_uri] => http://thebuffalobullet.com [syndication_source_id] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/feed/ [rss:comments] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/imitation-of-blacks/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/imitation-of-blacks/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 202 [syndication_permalink] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/imitation-of-blacks/ [syndication_item_hash] => f58c7bb4272e297018620717122337af ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 327 [tax_input] => Array ( [post_tag] => Array ( ) [category] => Array ( [0] => 1 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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Replacing images : CharlesMBlow2 - CharlesMBlow2 ON

CharlesMBlow2

 

by Charles M. Blow

Rachel Dolezal, a woman with no known black heritage, has apparently, through an elaborate scheme of deception and denial, claimed for years to be a product of black heritage.

This has sparked a national conversation about how race is constructed and enforced, to what extent it is cultural and experiential, and whether it is mutable and adoptable.

If this were simply a matter of a person appreciating, emulating or even appropriating the presentation and performance of a race other than the one society prescribes to her based simply on her appearance, it wouldn’t be a story.

But this isn’t simply that. This is about privilege, deceitful performance and a tortured attempt to avoid truth and confession by co-opting the language of struggle, infusing labyrinthine logic with the authority of the academy, and coat-tailing very real struggles of transgender people and transracial adoptees to defend one’s deception.

This is a spectacular exercise in hubris, narcissism and deflection.

And we have been distracted from real conversation about real things in order to try to contextualize a false life based on a false premise. For a moment, blackface seemed to matter more than actual black lives.

On this issue of appearance, Ezra Dolezal, her adopted brother, has described her transformation as a form of “blackface.” When Matt Lauer asked, “Have you done something to darken your complexion?” she responded, “I certainly don’t stay out of the sun.” (TMZ reported Wednesday that according to their “tanning sources,” Dolezal was a “loyal customer at Palm Beach Tan in Spokane” and “was a fan of Mystic Tan… a brand of spray tan.” Make of all that what you will.)

Dolezal added: “This is not some freak ‘Birth of a Nation’ mockery blackface performance. This is on a very real, connected level.”

Full stop. Let’s just marvel at the efficient catchphrase saturation in those sentences. She takes the whole universe of possible attacks and issues them in her own tongue as a method of neutralizing them. It is a clever, if calculated, bit of argumentation, the kind that one might practice in a mirror.

But Dolezal didn’t stop there. She also told the MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry, “I have really gone there with the experience, in terms of being a mother of two black sons and really owning what it means to experience and live blackness.”

Yes, but she did so by choice and with a trap door. She was always aware that she could remove her weave and stop tanning (assuming that’s true) and return to what society registers as whiteness. People of actual black heritage don’t have that option. Her sons don’t have that option. And make no mistake: Having that option is a privilege.

The whole notion of “transracial” as it has been applied to Dolezal is flawed in part because it isn’t equally available to all.

Whiteness in this country has historically been incredibly narrowly drawn to protect its purity, and this was not simply enforced by social mores, but also by law. Conversely, blackness was broadly drawn, serving as something of a collecting pool for anyone with even the most minute detectable and provable Negro ancestry. If you weren’t 100 percent white, you were black.

This meant that society became accustomed to blackness presenting visually in an infinite spectrum of possibilities, from pass-for-white lightness to obsidian darkness lacking all ambiguity.

This means that the way Dolezal was able to convincingly present and perform blackness as a light-skinned black woman is a form of one-directional privilege that simply isn’t available to a black person starting at the other end of the melanin spectrum.

Racial passing has been a societal feature probably for as long as race has been a societal construct. But it was more often practiced by a person who was not purely white by heritage passing herself or himself off as such. In some ways, this may have been understandable, even if distasteful, as these people identified as white in a society that privileged whiteness and devalued, diminished or attempted to destroy — both spiritually and physically — others.

Choosing a life of privilege over one of oppression must have seemed particularly attractive to some, particularly to those whose parents are different races and who, one could argue, could make the most compelling case to identify with whichever parent’s heritage they chose.

But Dolezal wasn’t passing in that sense. She was commandeering and concocting a biography of burden to obscure the shift and lay claim to authenticity.

According to a report in The Washington Post, however, the transracial-adoption (“when a child of one race is adopted by the family of another”) community has not taken kindly to being linked to Dolezal’s deception. Kimberly McKee, the assistant director of the Korean-American Adoptee Adoptive Parent Network and a professor at Grand Valley State University where she studies transracial adoption, told The Post, “You’re turning something that is a historical experience into something that’s almost being made a joke.”

A letter signed by McKee and 21 other scholars and advocates made the point even more forcefully: “We find the misuse of ‘transracial,’ describing the phenomenon of a white woman assuming perceived markers of ‘blackness’ in order to pass as ‘black,’ to be erroneous, ahistorical, and dangerous.”

Indeed, one would be hard pressed to find scientific support for transracialism, as it is being applied for Dolezal’s deception and identity, as a legitimate area of serious inquiry beyond a sociological phenomenon.

How can one be born discordant with a racial identity if race is a more socialized construct than rigid, biological demarcation and determinism? In other words, how can one be born discordant with an experience one has yet to have?

At best, this appears to be an issue of having an affinity for a culture that grows around a social construct. That is because, to my sense of it, cultural race identity has more scientific grounding than biological race identity, and those cultures of racial identity are in fact a response to the structure itself. Some people perform in response to their privilege and others to their lack thereof.

In that regard, one can not only like and want to emulate the look of another racial group (though, one must be ever-questioning of oneself as to what motivates this, making sure that it isn’t the outgrowth of self-hatred), but one can even prefer the culture that developed around that look.

But changing appearance and even cross-cultural immersion doesn’t alter the architecture of race that gave birth to and reinforced those differences in the first place.

Dolezal’s performance of blackness may have been born of affinity, but it was based on a lie — one she has never sufficiently recanted — and her feeble attempts to use professorial language and faux-intellectual obfuscations only add insult to the cultural injury.

(This column originally appeared in the New York Times JUNE 17, 2015 under the title “The Delusions of Rachel Dolezal”)

Charles M. Blow is a New York Times Columnist and nationally-known commentator: “I invite you to visit my blog By The Numbers, join me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter, or e-mail me at chblow@nytimes.com.”

Twitt

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Imitation of Blacks

 

by Charles M. Blow

Rachel Dolezal, a woman with no known black heritage, has apparently, through an elaborate scheme of deception and denial, claimed for years to be a product of black heritage.

This has sparked a national conversation about how race is constructed and enforced, to what extent it is cultural and experiential, and whether it is mutable and adoptable.

If this were simply a matter of a person appreciating, emulating or even appropriating the presentation and performance of a race other than the one society prescribes to her based simply on her appearance, it wouldn’t be a story.

But this isn’t simply that. This is about privilege, deceitful performance and a tortured attempt to avoid truth and confession by co-opting the language of struggle, infusing labyrinthine logic with the authority of the academy, and coat-tailing very real struggles of transgender people and transracial adoptees to defend one’s deception.

This is a spectacular exercise in hubris, narcissism and deflection.

And we have been distracted from real conversation about real things in order to try to contextualize a false life based on a false premise. For a moment, blackface seemed to matter more than actual black lives.

On this issue of appearance, Ezra Dolezal, her adopted brother, has described her transformation as a form of “blackface.” When Matt Lauer asked, “Have you done something to darken your complexion?” she responded, “I certainly don’t stay out of the sun.” (TMZ reported Wednesday that according to their “tanning sources,” Dolezal was a “loyal customer at Palm Beach Tan in Spokane” and “was a fan of Mystic Tan… a brand of spray tan.” Make of all that what you will.)

Dolezal added: “This is not some freak ‘Birth of a Nation’ mockery blackface performance. This is on a very real, connected level.”

Full stop. Let’s just marvel at the efficient catchphrase saturation in those sentences. She takes the whole universe of possible attacks and issues them in her own tongue as a method of neutralizing them. It is a clever, if calculated, bit of argumentation, the kind that one might practice in a mirror.

But Dolezal didn’t stop there. She also told the MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry, “I have really gone there with the experience, in terms of being a mother of two black sons and really owning what it means to experience and live blackness.”

Yes, but she did so by choice and with a trap door. She was always aware that she could remove her weave and stop tanning (assuming that’s true) and return to what society registers as whiteness. People of actual black heritage don’t have that option. Her sons don’t have that option. And make no mistake: Having that option is a privilege.

The whole notion of “transracial” as it has been applied to Dolezal is flawed in part because it isn’t equally available to all.

Whiteness in this country has historically been incredibly narrowly drawn to protect its purity, and this was not simply enforced by social mores, but also by law. Conversely, blackness was broadly drawn, serving as something of a collecting pool for anyone with even the most minute detectable and provable Negro ancestry. If you weren’t 100 percent white, you were black.

This meant that society became accustomed to blackness presenting visually in an infinite spectrum of possibilities, from pass-for-white lightness to obsidian darkness lacking all ambiguity.

This means that the way Dolezal was able to convincingly present and perform blackness as a light-skinned black woman is a form of one-directional privilege that simply isn’t available to a black person starting at the other end of the melanin spectrum.

Racial passing has been a societal feature probably for as long as race has been a societal construct. But it was more often practiced by a person who was not purely white by heritage passing herself or himself off as such. In some ways, this may have been understandable, even if distasteful, as these people identified as white in a society that privileged whiteness and devalued, diminished or attempted to destroy — both spiritually and physically — others.

Choosing a life of privilege over one of oppression must have seemed particularly attractive to some, particularly to those whose parents are different races and who, one could argue, could make the most compelling case to identify with whichever parent’s heritage they chose.

But Dolezal wasn’t passing in that sense. She was commandeering and concocting a biography of burden to obscure the shift and lay claim to authenticity.

According to a report in The Washington Post, however, the transracial-adoption (“when a child of one race is adopted by the family of another”) community has not taken kindly to being linked to Dolezal’s deception. Kimberly McKee, the assistant director of the Korean-American Adoptee Adoptive Parent Network and a professor at Grand Valley State University where she studies transracial adoption, told The Post, “You’re turning something that is a historical experience into something that’s almost being made a joke.”

A letter signed by McKee and 21 other scholars and advocates made the point even more forcefully: “We find the misuse of ‘transracial,’ describing the phenomenon of a white woman assuming perceived markers of ‘blackness’ in order to pass as ‘black,’ to be erroneous, ahistorical, and dangerous.”

Indeed, one would be hard pressed to find scientific support for transracialism, as it is being applied for Dolezal’s deception and identity, as a legitimate area of serious inquiry beyond a sociological phenomenon.

How can one be born discordant with a racial identity if race is a more socialized construct than rigid, biological demarcation and determinism? In other words, how can one be born discordant with an experience one has yet to have?

At best, this appears to be an issue of having an affinity for a culture that grows around a social construct. That is because, to my sense of it, cultural race identity has more scientific grounding than biological race identity, and those cultures of racial identity are in fact a response to the structure itself. Some people perform in response to their privilege and others to their lack thereof.

In that regard, one can not only like and want to emulate the look of another racial group (though, one must be ever-questioning of oneself as to what motivates this, making sure that it isn’t the outgrowth of self-hatred), but one can even prefer the culture that developed around that look.

But changing appearance and even cross-cultural immersion doesn’t alter the architecture of race that gave birth to and reinforced those differences in the first place.

Dolezal’s performance of blackness may have been born of affinity, but it was based on a lie — one she has never sufficiently recanted — and her feeble attempts to use professorial language and faux-intellectual obfuscations only add insult to the cultural injury.

(This column originally appeared in the New York Times JUNE 17, 2015 under the title “The Delusions of Rachel Dolezal”)

Charles M. Blow is a New York Times Columnist and nationally-known commentator: “I invite you to visit my blog By The Numbers, join me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter, or e-mail me at chblow@nytimes.com.”

Twitt

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by Charles M. Blow

Rachel Dolezal, a woman with no known black heritage, has apparently, through an elaborate scheme of deception and denial, claimed for years to be a product of black heritage.

This has sparked a national conversation about how race is constructed and enforced, to what extent it is cultural and experiential, and whether it is mutable and adoptable.

If this were simply a matter of a person appreciating, emulating or even appropriating the presentation and performance of a race other than the one society prescribes to her based simply on her appearance, it wouldn’t be a story.

But this isn’t simply that. This is about privilege, deceitful performance and a tortured attempt to avoid truth and confession by co-opting the language of struggle, infusing labyrinthine logic with the authority of the academy, and coat-tailing very real struggles of transgender people and transracial adoptees to defend one’s deception.

This is a spectacular exercise in hubris, narcissism and deflection.

And we have been distracted from real conversation about real things in order to try to contextualize a false life based on a false premise. For a moment, blackface seemed to matter more than actual black lives.

On this issue of appearance, Ezra Dolezal, her adopted brother, has described her transformation as a form of “blackface.” When Matt Lauer asked, “Have you done something to darken your complexion?” she responded, “I certainly don’t stay out of the sun.” (TMZ reported Wednesday that according to their “tanning sources,” Dolezal was a “loyal customer at Palm Beach Tan in Spokane” and “was a fan of Mystic Tan… a brand of spray tan.” Make of all that what you will.)

Dolezal added: “This is not some freak ‘Birth of a Nation’ mockery blackface performance. This is on a very real, connected level.”

Full stop. Let’s just marvel at the efficient catchphrase saturation in those sentences. She takes the whole universe of possible attacks and issues them in her own tongue as a method of neutralizing them. It is a clever, if calculated, bit of argumentation, the kind that one might practice in a mirror.

But Dolezal didn’t stop there. She also told the MSNBC host Melissa Harris-Perry, “I have really gone there with the experience, in terms of being a mother of two black sons and really owning what it means to experience and live blackness.”

Yes, but she did so by choice and with a trap door. She was always aware that she could remove her weave and stop tanning (assuming that’s true) and return to what society registers as whiteness. People of actual black heritage don’t have that option. Her sons don’t have that option. And make no mistake: Having that option is a privilege.

The whole notion of “transracial” as it has been applied to Dolezal is flawed in part because it isn’t equally available to all.

Whiteness in this country has historically been incredibly narrowly drawn to protect its purity, and this was not simply enforced by social mores, but also by law. Conversely, blackness was broadly drawn, serving as something of a collecting pool for anyone with even the most minute detectable and provable Negro ancestry. If you weren’t 100 percent white, you were black.

This meant that society became accustomed to blackness presenting visually in an infinite spectrum of possibilities, from pass-for-white lightness to obsidian darkness lacking all ambiguity.

This means that the way Dolezal was able to convincingly present and perform blackness as a light-skinned black woman is a form of one-directional privilege that simply isn’t available to a black person starting at the other end of the melanin spectrum.

Racial passing has been a societal feature probably for as long as race has been a societal construct. But it was more often practiced by a person who was not purely white by heritage passing herself or himself off as such. In some ways, this may have been understandable, even if distasteful, as these people identified as white in a society that privileged whiteness and devalued, diminished or attempted to destroy — both spiritually and physically — others.

Choosing a life of privilege over one of oppression must have seemed particularly attractive to some, particularly to those whose parents are different races and who, one could argue, could make the most compelling case to identify with whichever parent’s heritage they chose.

But Dolezal wasn’t passing in that sense. She was commandeering and concocting a biography of burden to obscure the shift and lay claim to authenticity.

According to a report in The Washington Post, however, the transracial-adoption (“when a child of one race is adopted by the family of another”) community has not taken kindly to being linked to Dolezal’s deception. Kimberly McKee, the assistant director of the Korean-American Adoptee Adoptive Parent Network and a professor at Grand Valley State University where she studies transracial adoption, told The Post, “You’re turning something that is a historical experience into something that’s almost being made a joke.”

A letter signed by McKee and 21 other scholars and advocates made the point even more forcefully: “We find the misuse of ‘transracial,’ describing the phenomenon of a white woman assuming perceived markers of ‘blackness’ in order to pass as ‘black,’ to be erroneous, ahistorical, and dangerous.”

Indeed, one would be hard pressed to find scientific support for transracialism, as it is being applied for Dolezal’s deception and identity, as a legitimate area of serious inquiry beyond a sociological phenomenon.

How can one be born discordant with a racial identity if race is a more socialized construct than rigid, biological demarcation and determinism? In other words, how can one be born discordant with an experience one has yet to have?

At best, this appears to be an issue of having an affinity for a culture that grows around a social construct. That is because, to my sense of it, cultural race identity has more scientific grounding than biological race identity, and those cultures of racial identity are in fact a response to the structure itself. Some people perform in response to their privilege and others to their lack thereof.

In that regard, one can not only like and want to emulate the look of another racial group (though, one must be ever-questioning of oneself as to what motivates this, making sure that it isn’t the outgrowth of self-hatred), but one can even prefer the culture that developed around that look.

But changing appearance and even cross-cultural immersion doesn’t alter the architecture of race that gave birth to and reinforced those differences in the first place.

Dolezal’s performance of blackness may have been born of affinity, but it was based on a lie — one she has never sufficiently recanted — and her feeble attempts to use professorial language and faux-intellectual obfuscations only add insult to the cultural injury.

(This column originally appeared in the New York Times JUNE 17, 2015 under the title “The Delusions of Rachel Dolezal”)

Charles M. Blow is a New York Times Columnist and nationally-known commentator: “I invite you to visit my blog By The Numbers, join me on Facebook and follow me on Twitter, or e-mail me at chblow@nytimes.com.”

Imitation of Blacks
[post_excerpt] =>   by Charles M. Blow Rachel Dolezal, a woman with no known black heritage, has apparently, through an elaborate scheme of deception and denial, claimed for years to be a product of black heritage. This has sparked a national conversation about how race is constructed and enforced, to what extent it is cultural and experiential, ...read more [post_date_gmt] => 2015-07-05 22:55:59 [post_date] => 2015-07-05 18:55:59 [post_modified_gmt] => 2015-07-05 22:55:59 [post_modified] => 2015-07-05 18:55:59 [post_status] => pending [comment_status] => closed [ping_status] => closed [guid] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/?p=8005 [meta] => Array ( [enclosure] => Array ( [0] => ) [syndication_source] => The Buffalo Bullet [syndication_source_uri] => http://thebuffalobullet.com [syndication_source_id] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/feed/ [rss:comments] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/imitation-of-blacks/#comments [wfw:commentRSS] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/imitation-of-blacks/feed/ [syndication_feed] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/feed/ [syndication_feed_id] => 202 [syndication_permalink] => http://thebuffalobullet.com/imitation-of-blacks/ [syndication_item_hash] => f58c7bb4272e297018620717122337af [faf_featured_image] => 385064 [faf_process_image] => 385064,385065 ) [post_type] => post [post_author] => 327 [tax_input] => Array ( [post_tag] => Array ( ) [category] => Array ( [0] => 1 ) [post_format] => Array ( ) ) )

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WNYmedia Network http://wnymedia.net Live Streaming | Video | News from Buffalo, NY Sun, 05 Jul 2015 02:15:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.2 NY Energy Plan2015/NY Wind Energy in 2014 http://wagengineering.blogspot.com/2015/07/ny-energy-plan2015ny-wind-energy-in-2014.html http://wagengineering.blogspot.com/2015/07/ny-energy-plan2015ny-wind-energy-in-2014.html#comments Sun, 05 Jul 2015 02:15:22 +0000 http://wnymedia.net/?p=384860 NY City’s only wind turbine of note, a 100 kw Northern Power Systems (a true champion in its class) installed in Brooklyn (Sunset Park, South Brooklyn Marine Terminal), owned by an Australian company, Sims Metal Management – http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/16/nyregion/brooklyn-waterfront-is-fertile-ground-for-citys-first-large-scale-wind-turbine.html?_r=0. Too bad it takes a foreigner to do what is right in this state, as no USA oligarchs in […]]]> http://wagengineering.blogspot.com/2015/07/ny-energy-plan2015ny-wind-energy-in-2014.html/feed/ 0 FC Buffalo vs Erie live at 7pm  http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/fc-buffalo-vs-erie-live-at-7pm/ http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/fc-buffalo-vs-erie-live-at-7pm/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 21:30:57 +0000 http://wnymedia.net/?p=384664 http://mixlr.com/wnymedia-network  ]]> http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/fc-buffalo-vs-erie-live-at-7pm/feed/ 0 Homeless Florida man’s beautiful piano performance might earn him a job http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/homeless-florida-mans-beautiful-piano-performance-might-earn-him-a-job/ http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/homeless-florida-mans-beautiful-piano-performance-might-earn-him-a-job/#comments Fri, 03 Jul 2015 18:00:30 +0000 http://wnymedia.net/?p=384603 ” ‘We went outside to chat and we saw him playing and it was so phenomenal that I got my phone out to start recording it,’ Henry, 34, of Suffield, Connecticut, told ABC News. ‘Obviously I had no idea this would become such a thing. I put it on Facebook and I saw a few […]]]> http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/homeless-florida-mans-beautiful-piano-performance-might-earn-him-a-job/feed/ 0 Buffalo Audubon July/August Public Programs http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/buffalo-audubon-julyaugust-public-programs/ http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/buffalo-audubon-julyaugust-public-programs/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 18:55:03 +0000 http://wnymedia.net/?p=383502 July   Full Moon Walk Thursday, July 2 8:30-10pm Adults: $5 pre-registration required Beaver Meadow Audubon Center, 1610 Welch Rd., North Java, NY 14113 Join us in exploring the trails under the light of July’s Full “Buck” Moon! Pre-registration is required. Please call 585-457-3228 to register.   Observatory at Beaver Meadow Saturday, July 4 Dusk […]]]> http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/buffalo-audubon-julyaugust-public-programs/feed/ 0 The Public Good with Kevin Connor http://www.ppgbuffalo.org/the-public-good-with-kevin-connor/ http://www.ppgbuffalo.org/the-public-good-with-kevin-connor/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 18:14:11 +0000 http://www.ppgbuffalo.org/?p=7035 Kevin Connor of the Public Accountability Initiative discusses their three part report on Carl Paladino: his bigoted statements, his campaign donations, and his receipt of tax incentives from state and local governments.   ]]> http://www.ppgbuffalo.org/the-public-good-with-kevin-connor/feed/ 0 Are You Ready for the Fun Part? Saying Goodbye to the Dark Ages of Sabres Hockey by @mmigliore http://buffalowins.net/uncategorized/are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore http://buffalowins.net/uncategorized/are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:08:31 +0000 http://buffalowins.net/?p=10607 (I thought the ending of Super Troopers was a good metaphor for Sabres fans who don’t have to take any crap anymore about their team) The 2015 offseason has only been officially underway for a few days, but already there’s been plenty for Buffalo Sabres fans to celebrate. The major headlines, of course, have been […]]]> http://buffalowins.net/uncategorized/are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore.html/feed 0 Are You Ready for the Fun Part? Saying Goodbye to the Dark Ages of Sabres Hockey by @mmigliore http://buffalowins.net/uncategorized/are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore http://buffalowins.net/uncategorized/are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore.html?utm_source=rss&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:08:31 +0000 http://buffalowins.net/?p=10607 (I thought the ending of Super Troopers was a good metaphor for Sabres fans who don’t have to take any crap anymore about their team) The 2015 offseason has only been officially underway for a few days, but already there’s been plenty for Buffalo Sabres fans to celebrate. The major headlines, of course, have been […]]]> http://buffalowins.net/uncategorized/are-your-ready-for-the-fun-part-saying-goodbye-to-the-dark-ages-of-sabres-hockey-by-mmigliore.html/feed 0 2015 MLB Corner Episode VI: All Star Edition http://www.buffalovibe.com/articles/sports/2015-mlb-corner-episode-vi-all-star-edition http://www.buffalovibe.com/articles/sports/2015-mlb-corner-episode-vi-all-star-edition#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 04:00:00 +0000 /articles/sports/2015-mlb-corner-episode-vi-all-star-edition A-Rod & His Milestone   Alex Rodriguez used PED’s.  He cheated. Steroids helped him hit the ball farther and his body to recuperate faster. What they didn’t do is improve his ability to hit the ball in the first place; he…]]> http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/2015-mlb-corner-episode-vi-all-star-edition/feed/ 0 Floating Record Vertical Turntable http://www.buffalovibe.com/articles/artsculture/floating-record-vertical-turntable http://www.buffalovibe.com/articles/artsculture/floating-record-vertical-turntable#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 04:00:00 +0000 /articles/artsculture/floating-record-vertical-turntable Fresh off the heels of the successful VINYL MANIA Record Convention comes this rather ingenious take on the classic turntable. The Floating Record Vertical Turntable takes the concept of displaying your vinyl while listening to it to a whole new level by literally turning it…]]> http://wnymedia.net/2015/07/floating-record-vertical-turntable-2/feed/ 0 PiddCast Episode 32 – WNYmedia Network http://www.projectfunnyface.com/piddcast-episode-32-wnymedia-network/ http://www.projectfunnyface.com/piddcast-episode-32-wnymedia-network/#comments Thu, 02 Jul 2015 01:47:28 +0000 http://www.projectfunnyface.com/?p=281 Jimi Pidd and Brian Netzel talk with the guys from wnymedia.net. We discuss technology, live shows, comedy, and Jimi’s apparent chess championship.   This episode also features Just Liam Downloadable File   Email PiddCast @Piddcast @BrianNetzelJr @lee_um_patrick @wnymedia]]> http://www.projectfunnyface.com/piddcast-episode-32-wnymedia-network/feed/ 0